Minnesota Restorable Wetland Decision Support - Viability

This page last updated: 06/30/2014
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1. Overview
2. Data Quality
3. Data Organization
4. Coordinate System
5. Attributes
6. Distribution - Get Data
7. Metadata Reference

Section 1 Overview
Originator Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota
Title Minnesota Restorable Wetland Decision Support - Viability
Abstract Wetland restoration success is significantly affected by several factors and many of these same factors affect the persistence of functioning wetlands. The viability layer allows users to prioritize wetland viability by prioritizing target areas based on topography, land ownership, network position, and soil types. The index is a grid (30 meter resolution) that was developed using the following GIS inputs:

- 2008 GAP Stewardship - public and private land ownership
- National Elevation Dataset (NED) 10 meter Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived Compound Topographic Index (CTI) - topography
- Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) - hydric soils classifications
- MNDNR lakeshed autocatchments - network position
- 2011 National Land Cover Dataset (2011 NLCD) - upland and wetland land covers

The inputs were combined into a single Viability score through an expert panel weighting process. The influence of the surrounding natural landscape on viability was also addressed. The relative influence of the different natural upland and wetland land covers were weighted for the following landscape positions:

Immediate influences
The immediate land characteristics at the restoration site can influence a wetland restoration at many different levels including the feasibility of constructing the wetland (i.e. some level of urban development), the initial stress at the site (cultivated crops or high intensity development, population density, etc), the long term viability of the wetland (hydric soil classification, ownership, topography) , and the potential benefits resulting from restoration (habitat potential or water quality risk).

Direct distances
The direct distance to certain land covers can also impact wetlands. For instance, roads can impact water quality through runoff and erosion and habitat through wildlife mortality. Alternatively nearby wetlands can influence water quality and habitat through hydrologic connectivity. Biodiversity can also be influenced through see dispersal and population migration.

Focal density
Along with the immediate surroundings the larger neighboring area can also play a role in defining the ultimate characteristics of a restored wetland. Higher densities of developed or agricultural land covers can influence water quality and habitat. Higher densities of public ownership might reduce the likelihood of current natural upland and wetland areas from being developed.

Upstream influences
Restorable wetland locations are also influenced by their upstream areas including both the amount of upstream area and the types of upstream land covers.

Spatial influences for both the natural upland and natural wetland land covers (2011 NLCD) were accounted for.

Funding
The development of this data was supported through the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment.
Purpose The Viability decision layer was developed with the purpose of predicting areas that are most likely to remain a high functioning wetlands long into the future). The decision layer predicts relative viability across the entire Minnesota extent.
Time Period of Content Date 06/30/2014
Currentness Reference
Progress Complete
Maintenance and Update Frequency None Planned
Spatial Extent of Data
Bounding Coordinates -97.555013
-89.102809
49.550264
43.267894
Place Keywords
Theme Keywords Restorable wetlands, viability, landscape
Theme Keyword Thesaurus
Access Constraints
Use Constraints
Contact Person Information Catalog Manager,
Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota
5013 Miller Trunk Highway
Duluth, MN  55803
Phone: 218-788-2694
Email: nrri-gis@d.umn.edu
Browse Graphic None available
Associated Data Sets

Section 2 Data Quality
Attribute Accuracy
Logical Consistency
Completeness
Horizontal Positional Accuracy
Lineage

Section 3 Spatial Data Organization (not used in this metadata)

Section 4 Coordinate System
Horizontal Coordinate Scheme Universal Transverse Mercator
UTM Zone Number 15
Horizontal Datum NAD83
Horizontal Units meters
Cell Width 30
Cell Height 30

Section 5 Attributes
Overview
Detailed Citation
Table Detail:

Section 6 Distribution
Publisher Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota
Publication Date 06/30/2014
Contact Person Information Catalog Manager,
Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota
5013 Miller Trunk Highway
Duluth, MN  55803
Phone: 218-788-2694
Email: nrri-gis@d.umn.edu
Distributor's Data Set Identifier
Distribution Liability
Ordering Instructions
Online Linkage None available

Section 7 Metadata Reference
Metadata Date 06/30/2014
Contact Person Information Catalog Manager,
Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota
5013 Miller Trunk Highway
Duluth, MN  55803
Phone: 218-788-2694
Email: nrri-gis@d.umn.edu
Metadata Standard Name
Metadata Standard Version
Metadata Standard Online Linkage


This page last updated: 06/30/2014
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